7 MUST HAVE BOOKS ABOUT CONSCIOUS AND SUSTAINABLE LIVING

Starting your pursuit of zero-waste, sustainable and conscious living means looking carefully at how you consume and what kinds of waste that produces. Living that way is not something that we are born knowing how to do. Especially if you’re new to these topics a good non-fiction book will help you to manifest the idea that people can live simply and well.

The Following books will inspire you for a more sustainable, eco-conscious and thoughtful way of living.

Zero Waste Home: The Ultimate Guide to Simplifying Your Life by Reducing Your Waste by Bea Johnson

Part inspirational story of Bea Johnson (the “Priestess of Waste-Free Living”) and how she transformed her family’s life for the better by reducing their waste to an astonishing one liter per year; part practical, step-by-step guide that gives readers tools and tips to diminish their footprint and simplify their lives.

Many of us have the gnawing feeling that we could and should do more to limit our impact on the environment. But where to begin?

This Book will definitely help you

Simply Living Well: A Guide to Creating a Natural, Low-Waste Home by Julia Watkins

In this timely and motivational guide, author Julia Watkins shares rituals, recipes, and projects for living simply and sustainably at home. For every area of your household—kitchen, cleaning, wellness, bath, and garden—Julia shows you how to eliminate wasteful packaging, harmful ingredients, and disposable items. 

Root, Nurture, Grow: The Essential Guide to Propagating and Sharing Houseplants by Rose Ray, Caro Langton

The stylish handbook shows you how to make the most of your favorite houseplants through simple, beginner-friendly propagation techniques (such as stem cutting, rooting in water, runners, offsets, grafting, division and more), as well as resourceful DIY projects including homemade rooting mediums, seed-bombs, and a self-watering plant pot.

It shows you how to look after and nurture your new plant babies, and how to share them with friends by making beautiful gifts and displays. 

No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference by Greta Thunberg

‘Everything needs to change. And it has to start today’. This book brings you Greta in her own words, for the first time. Collecting her speeches that have made history across Europe, from the UN to mass street protests, No One Is Too Small to Make A Difference is a rallying cry for why we must all wake up and fight to protect the living planet, no matter how powerless we feel. Our future depends upon it.

Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion by Elizabeth L. Cline

In Overdressed, Cline sets out to uncover the true nature of the cheap fashion juggernaut, tracing the rise of budget clothing chains, the death of middle-market and independent retail­ers. She travels to cheap-chic factories in China, follows the fashion industry as it chases even lower costs into Bangladesh, and looks at the impact of America’s drastic increase in imports. She even explores how cheap fashion harms the charity thrift shops and textile recyclers where our masses of cloth­ing castoffs end up.

Secondhand: Travels in the New Global Garage Sale by Adam Minter 

Downsizing. Decluttering. A parent’s death. Sooner or later, all of us are faced with things we no longer need or want.

In Secondhand, journalist Adam Minter takes us on an unexpected adventure into the often-hidden, multibillion-dollar industry of reuse: thrift stores in the American Southwest to vintage shops in Tokyo, flea markets in Southeast Asia to used-goods enterprises in Ghana, and more. Along the way, Minter meets the fascinating people who handle-and profit from.

Green Housekeeping: Recipes and solutions for a cleaner, more sustainable home by Christina Strutt

Saving the planet for future generations is a laudable aim, but what about the current populace? Why wait when even quite small lifestyle changes can make a big difference now? Green Housekeeping is full of advice and information to help you take a more sustainable path.

Break the shampoo habit – this is how the switch to natural hair care works!

Anyone who has recently turned their attention to the incomprehensible ingredients of their hair-care products has certainly landed informative websites and found skin-irritating, allergenic or even carcinogenic substances in body and hair care products.

The use of microplastics (hidden behind cryptic names), silicones or anionic surfactants also makes you think and leads many to the decision to fall back on natural products. But especially when switching to mild shampoos and cleansing methods, the oil release regulates only slowly.

Legacy silicone, polyquaternium or related substances with word syllables of “quat” are washed out only slowly.

In this article you’ll learn how a switch to natural hair shampoos is more enjoyable, prevents dehydration, and how the individual care you need gets to where it’s needed.

FIRST STEP: Removal of chemical reSIDUES!

In order for the changeover to the new cleansers or alternative methods, it is good to remove any remaining chemical residues from the old shampoos and conditioners.

As a quick method, three to five hair washes with sodium bicarbonate (e.g. Natron -> US shipping) with a wash interval of four days have proven to be effective.

Photo by Kaboompics .com on Pexels.com

This sodium bicarbonate deep cleansing is applied as follows:

  • Dissolve one teaspoon of baking soda (US shipping) in 100 ml of lukewarm water (up to three times this amount is needed for longer hair). Alternatively, mix one tablespoon of baking soda (EU shipping) to two tablespoons of lukewarm water to form a paste. Wet the hair with warm water before applying so that the cuticle opens and the silicone stored in it is also washed out.
  • Gently massage the mixture on the scalp. In the process, the mass becomes slippery and can cause color changes even in uncolored hair. Chemically dyed hair may lose color with each wash of baking soda.

SECOND STEP: To neutralize the sodium hydroxide, an acidic rinse should follow each soda wash!

Photo by Mareefe on Pexels.com

Mix either one to three tablespoons of wine vinegar (-> EU-shipping), the juice of one lemon with one liter of cold water or prepare a tea extract from hibiscus flowers (-> US-shipping) (reddish coloring). This rinse is distributed cold over the scalp and hair lengths and can be left in the hair as a leave-in. However, a very cold final rinse is also beneficial, as the increasing cold ensures that the skin and hair scales, which were opened by the warm cleansing process, are securely attached.

A less drastic, but also much more tedious method is the prolonged use of a silicone-free or quaternium-free shampoo. Hair conditioner, hair treatment and care products should also be free of these substances.

FAIRLUTION IS HERE TO GIVE YOU A WEEKLY GUIDE FOR A FAIR AND CONSCIOUS LIFESTYLE IN FASHION AND BEAUTY!

Join our Email-list if you willing to make a change too!

Vegan treasure for your fingertips

Having a manicure and pedicure is one of many peoples favorite self-care practices. But finding a nail salon that uses nontoxic and natural products isn’t always easy. 

Nail polish is a component of cosmetics that will certainly never go out of fashion. New trend colors come every season on the nails, usually they are oriented to de current catwalk looks. Unluckily, many of the ingredients include chemicals and toxins that can potentially damage the skin and the nail. But don’t worry, we found 6 non-toxic nail polish and lacquer brands that are vegan and natural you can use within your nail routine at home.

Let’s get started!

6 Vegan nail-polish brands for Your Nail Routine at home

1. Gitti

Vegan & animal-free: By producing Gitti’s vegan nail polishes and nail care, no animal is ever harmed.

Natural base: The nail polishes and care contain selected and innovative ingredients. Gitti’s claim is to use as many natural ingredients as possible.

Responsible: All gitti products are manufactured in an environmentally friendly way by certified partner laboratory in France.

2. Kia Charlotta

All Kia Charlotta nail polishes are vegan, animal-free and 15 Free.

This means that Kia C. don’t use the following 15 of the most commonly used harmful ingredients in their nail polishes: Phthalates (including dibutyl phthalate (DBP), diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP)), toluene (aka: methylbenzene), xylene, camphor, formaldehyde, formaldehyde resin, ethyl tosylamide, styrene/acrylates copolymer, triphenyl phosphate, rosin, benzophenones, parabens, silicone, fragrances, animal ingredients. In addition, their nail polish colors do not contain Acrylates Copolymer or any other liquid or solid microplastics* or gluten.

3. ncLA

NCLA Beauty debuted in 2010 with a small collection of products that developed into an award-winning, cult favorite beauty line of lip care, nail care, body care, and more. The cruelty-free line is always made in the USA with clean, vegan ingredients.

4. Côte

Côte founders Mary Lennon and Leah Yari created côte to provide a safe, transparent, quality product and an elegant nail care experience that could be shared with their families and friends without worry. They set out to take the “toxins” out of the nail treatment experience

5. AILA

Gorgeous Color Without Common Ingredients. AILA, provides healthy alternatives to traditional nail products. All nail lacquers are Vegan, Cruelty-free, and Gluten-free.

6. Priti NYC

PRITI NYC  Nail Polishes are Vegan, Cruelty Free and Gluten Free. 
The polishes are free of Toxins and Parabens. All known to be harmful to human health. These luxury polishes are fast drying, chip resistant, contain a UV inhibitor, and are extremely durable and glossy. Available in over 80 different shades including metallics, mattes, bright neons, rich darks, classic nudes, and everything in between. 

Here are some of our favorite products you can use for your nail routine: